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Hat tip to Dr Stuart Jeanne Bramhall .  You can read her review of the documentary here.

Norm’s note: two things were at the back of my mind while I watched this documentary:

The first was Lenin’s The State and Revolution, which you can read simply by following the link incorporated in the foregoing highlighted title.

The second thing which I had in mind (as a caveat to Lenin’s thesis) was an essay by Daniel Guérin, titled “Three Problems of the Revolution,” and in particular this paragraph from that essay:

“But, though class instinct impels them to break their chains, the masses of the people lack education and consciousness. And as they surge with redoubtable energy, but clumsily and blindly, towards freedom, bumping into privileged, astute, expert, organized and experienced social classes, they can only triumph over the resistance they encounter if they successfully acquire, in the heat of battle, the consciousness, expertise, organization and experience in which they are deficient. But the very act of forging the weapons just listed, which are the only ones that can ensure that they get the better of their adversary, carries with it an enormous danger: that it might kill the spontaneity which is the heart of the revolution, that it might compromise freedom inside the organization, or allow the movement to be taken over by a minority elite of more expert, more aware, more experienced militants who, to start with put themselves forward as guides, only to end up imposing themselves as leaders and subjecting the masses to some new form of man’s exploitation of his fellow men.”

 

Vimeo film summary:

In October 2008 Iceland was hit with one of the biggest financial disasters any nation in the world had experienced. In response, citizens took to the streets creating what is now known as the “Pots and Pans Revolution”.

In response to widespread media silence and a growing global trend towards people-led movements, this documentary explores how and why the people of Iceland resisted the measures imposed by their government following the crisis of 2008 and how they forced their government to resign in an attempt to forge a new political path.

Filmed in Reykjavik between 2012 and 2014, the documentary meets the instigators of the revolution and follows the most important National Referendum in Iceland’s history. Giving the Icelandic people the opportunity to decide whether to support a constitution that had been created through a popular grassroots movement. Through this we explore the Icelanders’ story of their nation and their revolution but also what lessons can be learned globally from their experiences.

In light of a growing international trend towards grassroots movements crossing over into mainstream politics. This documentary is a timely portrayal of one such movement and their struggle to change the face of democracy.